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Nestled on the French Riviera is the stunning cosmopolitan city of Nice, the second-largest city in France. Appropriately nicknamed Nice la Belle, translating to Nice the Beautiful, the city sits on the Mediterranean coastline on the southeast of France. It’s incredible Mediterranean climate has caught the attention of many upper class nationalities over the years, attracting property investors, international residents and jet-setters purchasing second homes in the city.

Nice first attracted the attention of wealthy Englishmen during the 18th Century, when aristocratic families preferred spending their winters in the warmer Mediterranean climate that the Côte d’Azur offers. The main seaside promenade in Nice, Promenade​ des Anglais,​ translating to Walkway of the English, comes from the resort town’s original holidaymakers.

Nice’s growing popularity with tourists as well as residents has forced the city into making changes and develop further with new hotels and residences. Nice currently has the second largest hotel capacity in France and hosts over four million visitors per year. It’s local airport, Nice Côte d'Azur International Airport, is also one of the busiest in France, coming in third place after the two airports in the nation’s capital of Paris. The airport is also a gateway for visitors on their way to the Principality of Monaco, located just 8 miles (13km) away.

Aside from the city’s beautiful views, excellent weather conditions and historic buildings, Nice also holds its position as a significant cultural centre. The city has, over the years, attracted many famous painters and sculptors, including Chagall, Matisse and Arman, to name a few. The city’s rich history and the works of local famous artists is represented in local museums, including the Musée Marc Chagall, Musée Matisse and the Musée des Beaux-Arts, among others. Nice has also been home to several significant composers and intellectuals over time.

The ​Mediterranean climate is one of the most attracting characters of Nice, offering hot coastal summers and mild winters with little rainfall. Snow is so extremely rare in Nice that, when it does snow, locals celebrate these days with special events throughout the city. The area benefits of natural vegetation that is consistent with a Mediterranean climate, with evergreen shrubs, dense forested areas, palm trees, eucalyptus and citrus fruit trees.

The port of Nice, also known as Lympia Port is one of the most popular on the French Riviera. The port’s nickname comes from the Lympia spring, known for feeding the lake where work was started on the port in 1745. Aside from the city’s main Lympia Port, there is also a smaller port in the Carras district.

Vieux Nice (Old Town) is one of the most tranquil areas in the city. The street running parallel to the Promenade des Anglais is known as one of the most popular pedestrian zones in Nice; cars in this area are forbidden. Vieux Nice is home to many historical squares, lined with exquisite restaurants offering all types of cuisine, including traditional Niçoise, French, Spanish and Italian, among others. Niçois cuisine is similar to that of Provence, Liguria and Piedmont, using local ingredients including anchovies, fruit, vegetables and olive oil. Other products are delivered by Northern European ships visiting Nice to collect local olive oil.

Vieux Nice also has endless cafés and bakeries with beautiful terraces where one can enjoy the area’s fine offerings, as well as an abundance of small shops and boutiques selling clothes, shoes and souvenirs of the area.

Nice hosts several festivals throughout the year, including the famous Carnaval de Nice in February ​and the much-loved Nice Jazz Festival. Many of these festivals attract tourists from all over the world.

For more information about luxury property for sale in Nice and the French Riviera, you can use the property database search facility at the top of this page or complete the form below and a senior consultant from Butterfly Residential will be in touch.